What type of repairs show up on an inspection report? What do they cost to repair?

A home inspection is an extremely useful tool for homebuyers looking for a little extra information on the property they are looking to purchase. Professional home inspectors conduct hundreds of individual home inspections each year and are continually trained in how to spot defects that can cause problems in and around the house.

Without an inspection, what the untrained eye would view as a potential dream move, could quickly turn into a disaster. According to a report from Repair Pricer, the average home inspection report showed more than $11,000 in needed repairs. The study analyzed more than 50,000 home inspection reports.The report also found that, on average, homes studied required more than 20 repairs, so the cost of repairs could add up quickly. The average price per repair is just under $550.

Below are some common repairs needed as well as the average cost to make those repairs:

Water Leaks:

Water leaks make it to the number one spot in our most common home inspection issues as they can occur in a wide variety of locations throughout the home. A good way to check if you have a leak in the water supply is to turn off all the water in the house, wait for 15 minutes, and check the water meter to see if it’s running. If there is still water running during this check and there is a high chance you have a supply piping leak somewhere throughout the house.

Roof Damage:

The roof is one of the most important parts of the whole property structure as it protects your home from the outside elements and also helps to insulate the house during the winter months. If a homeowner does not conduct regular maintenance, such as cleaning leaves and the debris from the gutters, replacing damaged shingles, preventing ice dams, and caulking the flashings, there is a high chance of the roof falling into disrepair.

It is recommended that homeowners have their roof inspected annual if it is over 10 years in age and after severe weather events like hail storms, hurricanes, etc.

If the home inspector finds the roof merely needs a few shingles replaced this is not a major cause for concern as it is a relatively inexpensive and simple task to carry out. However, if the roof has more serious damage, installing a new roof can add up quickly.

Electrical Issues:

Examining the electrical components of the property is one of the most important aspects of the home inspectors’ job. Not only are some electrical issues expensive to repair, but they also present a fire hazard and a potential risk to human life.

Some repairs, like exchanging faulty GFCI outlets with new ones is relatively easy. While replacement of outdated wiring and electrical panels, such as Federal Pacific and Zinsco, account for nearly 3,000 US house fires and the leading cause of home fire civilian deaths.

One of the most common home inspection issues surrounding the electrical system is outdated wiring systems. For example, knob and tube wiring was particularly common between 1900 and 1950 years ago. The system does not use any form of grounding which is an important safety feature in modern electrical systems today. Another example is aluminum wiring which was a very popular method of electrical wiring in the 1960s and 1970s. Unfortunately, this type of wiring can overheat very quickly and is prone to electrical fires.

Plumbing Issues:

Plumbing issues are one of the most common things reported on a home inspection, especially in older homes. We separated this from water leaks because you can have plumbing issues without an actual leak being present.

Some of the problems are glaringly obvious to see, such as constantly running toilets, dripping faucets, and visible leaks.

However, there are quite a number of issues that the untrained eye would not pick up. Some of the main plumbing issues that can arise around the house are Inadequate or outdated piping, leaks and broken pipes, cross-connection issues, low or high water pressure, and problems of the water heater

Negative Surface Draining/Poor Drainage:

Negative surface grading is the term given when the ground around the building slopes towards the property. As rain falls, the water will naturally move towards the house and collect near the foundations.

Over time, this excess water will start to create puddles if there is inadequate drainage at this site. Negative grading and poor draining makes a huge contribution to structural issues and can cause a large amount of settlement if left untreated.

HVAC Problems:

Most people want to have a functioning heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system in their homes to provide adequate heating and cooling year-round. This is especially important in homes that are located in states that are subject to extreme temperatures.

For these units to function as they should, they require regular maintenance such as, air filter cleaning and replacement, upkeep of the ductwork throughout the home, and cleaning and servicing the equipment

Structural Issues:

Structural issues are some of the most serious and expensive problems you can find on the home inspection report. In most cases, structural issues occur due to the result of one or more of the items in our list being left unattended for a substantial period of time.

When we talk about the structural integrity of the building, we are typically referring to the four main components that make up the building. These are the foundation, walls, floors, and roof. All of these aspects are critical to the home’s integrity and the safety of the inhabitants. Some of the most common structural issues that home inspectors report are, abnormal settlement of the foundations, large cracks around the property, uneven flooring, bowing or bulging walls, and problems with the brickwork and masonry.

These are just some of the major items that could show on an inspection report. The inspector will also note any other defects throughout the house they may be minor and not as costly.